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Fork Energy: Engaging Structure and Mass

Submitted by Qiang on Mon, 01/04/2016 - 14:39

At the point of contact, you want to be able to generate at least two energies: one attacking the structure and one attacking the mass. The why and how of this may not be immediately obvious, but the principle behind this “fork” energy can be understood via simple models.

As a first pass to understanding, we remove complicating factors and reduce our analysis to the essentials needed for examining the underlying principles. Using a “spherical cow” approximation technique, we can do barebones thought experiments to derive the mechanisms of the fork energy.

Random Thoughts Dec 2015

Submitted by Qiang on Fri, 12/18/2015 - 08:12

Inching towards clarity

Sifu has said that he doesn’t teach anything new, rather we just understand things differently each time. I haven’t had any earth-shattering learning experiences with my training lately, so I take this to mean that enough of what Sifu has taught me has sunken in that my head no longer hurts when trying to grasp his lessons. Of course, there is still the possibility that I have completely misunderstood him and am operating with completely flawed model of reality.

The Kalama Sutta is the Buddha's exposition on free inquiry. The Buddha often advised those who listened to his talks to "come and see" or "be a lamp unto yourself". GM Sam Chin hopes all students will look deeply into this passage so they might recognize the "one feel of suchness" from their own direct experience.

The Kalama Sutta states (Pali expression in parentheses):[4]

Observation

Submitted by hollyanne on Mon, 11/09/2015 - 15:29

Observation

Neutral
Thoughts come and thoughts go
Flow
I am one with one
Present
Unattached, bright and calm
Observation

Judgment

Past
I have a like or a dislike
Opinion
I hate, I don’t like
React
I fight to be right
Stuck
I fight, I am wrong
Judgment

Recognition
I realize that I am wrong
See
I have a choice
Choose
What is
Suchness

By Holly Pope

Pics from Daria Sergeeva's visit to the UK

Submitted by mark w. on Wed, 10/07/2015 - 13:59

Just wanted to share some pics that are posted on the ILC London North East Face book page of our experience during Daria Sergeeva's visit to the UK for the British Tai Chi Unions 25th anniversary. Thanks again to Daria for spending time with us and Special thanks to Dan Docherty for inviting her to the UK.

https://www.facebook.com/I-Liq-Chuan-London-North-East-1431435440436161/...

It was a great weekend for ILC members and instructors in the UK who could make it and we hope to see Daria again soon.

Sifu Says - "You must be there to know.  This is the first thing."

Discourse by Grand Master Sam Chin

February 2014, Tucson, Arizona

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Tweets From June 2015 Master's Class

Submitted by Ashe Higgs on Thu, 07/09/2015 - 16:08
Ashe Higgs's picture


Here are my tweeted notes from the June Master Class, which took place on June 28th, 2015. This time around I decided to leave out my personal tweets altogether and only include Sifu's words.
I also left out any tweets where I missed an auto-correct error that could confuse readers who's native language is not English (there was only one).

The June 2015 Master Class was run more like old school classes that Sifu used to run when he taught regularly at the local level. Class began with refinements of the 15 basics and philosophy, concepts and principles, after which Sifu broke everyone up into smaller groups to work on their next level and assigned a senior student to work with that group on the material.

(Credit goes to Theresa Phillips, Tucson, AZ)

Discourse of Master Sam Chin at Phoenix, Arizona, Workshop, October 2012

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I Liq Chuan students Dr.Nancy Watterson and Lan Tran used this past semester to launch 2 academic full-credit courses featuring I Liq Chuan as a method of learning about learning. The interdisciplinary seminars (one offered to undergraduates at Cabrini College, the other to graduate students at the University of Pennsylvania) aimed to further ways of thinking about how people learn, about how people move, and about how to be more aware in everyday life.

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